Citation:

Waldeck, J. H. (2008). The Development of an Industry-Specific Online Learning Center: Consulting Lessons Learned. Communication Education, 57(4), 452-463. doi:10.1080/03634520801894747

Summary:

Waldeck (2008) created an online learning program for a business to accomplish educational objections. Waldeck (2008) create a series of web-based, industry specific, training modules that provided users with a place to communicate with peers in different markets and access information related to their markets. In addition, the programmers created a game of sorts which followed strategic moves and pitfalls associated with the industry. Waldeck (2008) assessed the success of the program through course assessments, enrollment figures, completion rates, participation in features and users response to the materials. The author found that business owners believed that their business management and leadership skills improved as result of their interaction with learning content. Though the program was successful, it only had a life of three years due to funding.

Review:

Overall, this is my favorite article that I found as it discusses a similar business partner version of an LMS like I work with at my job.  The article provides a broad analysis of how the LMS was created and to what purpose it serves and explains how an LMS is useful in a business setting. Though LMS are traditionally used in a classic education setting, I appreciate that the authors worked with a LMS in a nontraditional environment. My only critique is that the authors should have provided a larger scale example of their coding for success. I am also interested to see the results of a program like this over time, such as the profitability of those who took the courses.

Citation:

Mayor, M., & Ivars, A. (2007). E-Learning for interpreting. Babel, 53(4), 292-302. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.libproxy.lib.csusb.edu/ehost/detail?sid=45e05c70-8527-4d0a-9ea0-2f506254d739%40sessionmgr14&vid=1&hid=10&bdata=JnNpdGU9ZWhvc3QtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=ufh&AN=32192502

Summary:

The authors explain the simulations of real life experiences are often left out of elearning. Simulations, which include response to incidents and situations, are now being incorporated and offer a range of recording of these simulations for future interpretation and analysis. In method, the instructor has an PC which is equipped to view such presentations. Each training station is equipped with audio panel. The interactions gained during the time at these modules can be later reviewed, analyzed and evaluated to hone in on students skills. The training can even be proliferated through a website, granted the student has the tools. The benefits of such training include convenience, granting the students responsibility to complete the program, the teacher becomes a learning facilitator.       Furthermore, for such a distance program to be successful the program must have the following:

  1. Knowledge transfer. Students need to be able to apply what the learn in a distance setting to the real world.
  2. Learner must take an active role in learning.
  3. Learner must be able to deal with a variety of experience so that they can construct mental models of the experiences for future use.

Review:

This article is particularly useful, as it examines how real life training simulations can be offered in an elearning environment. The article more so provides a broad analysis of how such a simulation can be offered then an actual testing of such modules

I think that this article is useful as it provides a basis from which one can create a real life training simulation. I do think that programming of this such an LMS would be quite complicated, and I wonder how cost effective such a program would be. Additionally, though I find that the simulations would be useful, I am also interested how the simulations would actually translate into real world environments. Thus, I believe that future experimental research should be engaged so as to determine if the authors findings are useful and conduscive to elearning.

Citation:

O’Brien, M. (2009). THE E-LEARNING INDUSTRY. Rocky Mountain Communication Review, 6(1), 57-61. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.libproxy.lib.csusb.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=4&hid=10&sid=1e93d71f-8aba-463e-b344-0da4add8283a%40sessionmgr13

Summary:

O’Brien (2009) examines how face-to-face training is often preferred to online learning because of the isolation factor that is associated with online training. What has caused this context is that learning in the workplace is often informal, such as through (1) watching and modeling behaviors of coworkers, (2) there is no social way to relate to the online learning module. The second of the stated has changed through the use of social media forums. Thus, the authors finds that elearning training environments coupled with networking tools of support, the training online training environment may stand a chance against the favor of face-to-face communication. The author concludes that most LMS systems are purely modules that control and manage learning, but integration of social software can increase favor and use of online learning.

Review:

This article is particularly useful, as it examines the reasons why face-to-face training is preferred to online training. The article was based on what we already know, but lays out such concepts in a way that is easy to understand. I found it particularly useful how the article acknowledges that informal learning adds to ones basis of knowledge and therefore, that gain of such informal knowledge is important to incorporate when developing an LMS.

I think that this article is useful as it provides a basis of support of online social learning in the development of an LMS. In a consumer setting, I think that social learning through the use of forums can take this role in such a way that learning in a business environment can take place. Like O’Brien (2009), I believe that future research needs to develop social tools that are created to work with the LMS that elevate the elearning experience.

 

Citation:

Jayanti, R. K., & Singh, J. (2010). Pragmatic learning theory: An inquiry-action framework for distributed consumer learning in online communities. Journal of Consumer Research, 36(6), 1058-1081. Retrieved from http://web.ebscohost.com.libproxy.lib.csusb.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=f345dc5d-37fd-48c5-a991-900cc84c327e%40sessionmgr13&vid=1&hid=10

Summary:

The authors examine whether or not participation in online learning communities promotes empowered decision making among consumers. Jayanti and Singh (2010), like previous scholars, believe that decision making is something that is developed, thus it can be nurtured in an elearning environment. Jayanti and Singh (2010) engaged in a longitudal study which included sampling of forums on a asynchronous bulletin board. These boards were found through Google. The authors looked for boards with descriptive content and those which had a wide range of users. With in the forums, the authors looked for the number of threads related to a particular consumer issues, the length of the postings, the content and those which remained on track with the topic at hand. The information was coded based on when action was taken over a period of time, when each inquiry was laid forth, how was it explained, and how the pattern of inquiry continued in the forum.

Jayanti and Singh (2010) concluded the following:

  1. There are two basis of knowledge, that which is reflected through experience or acquisition. Inquiry bridges the different between knowledge and knowing.
  2. Inquiry and action forms in a cycle. Inquiry and experimental knowledge empowers decision making.
  3. Learning trajectories reflect diverse modes of learning – thus consumer learning can be a achieved by insinuating a motivating inquiry

Review:

            This is an interesting article, as it explores how users learn in an online learning community through methods of inquiry. I particularly found the tools and coding features that the authors presented as useful. I also like that the study was longitudal, which increases the studies validity.

Overall, I found that this article was useful as it acknowledges that inquiry is the point of which online learning can take place and develop. Similarly, I think that this article supports the use of forums in promoting learning and development of ones basis of knowledge. In a consumer setting, I think that forums do play this role in such a way that consumers learn more about a product and thus encourage (or discourage) one another based on the inquiry that occurred in the forum. Like the authors, I believe that future research needs to be done as to determine what makes online learning interaction social vs. action based.

 

Citation:

Liyan, S., & Hill, J. R. (2009). Understanding adult learners’ self regulation in online environments: A qualitative study. International Journal of Instructional Media, 36(3), 263-274. Retrieved from http://vnweb.hwwilsonweb.com.libproxy.lib.csusb.edu/hww/results/external_link_maincontentframe.jhtml?_DARGS=/hww/results/results_common.jhtml.44

Summary:

The authors of this article examine how learners self-regulate their learning through the use of resources, strategies, and motivation in synchronous and asynchronous environments. The researchers followed six participants who were in enrolled in an online course. The researchers engaged in a qualitative analysis which involved eighteen face-to-face interviews of the participants. Three semi-structure interviews were also conducted face-to-face throughout the term. Other data was obtained through online forums used in the online class. This data was used to provide further insight into the data provided by the interview. The data was analyzed through thematizing, coding and categorizing.

The authors found that self-regulated learning will help learners overcome challenges (resource use and motivation). Additionally, the authors found that online learners must use self-regulation skills more than face-to-face learners. These strategies include verbal communication strategies, more motivation to participate and the abilility to rationalize the use of online tools and activities when they are not monitored. The authors explain that more research is needed to understand tools that can be used to improve users online self-regulated skills.

Review:

This is an interesting article, as it explores how users are kept engaged in an online learning environment through self regulation. However, this article did lack which coding tools and resources it used in its qualitative analysis. I also thought the sample size of six students was far too small to be completely reliable.

Though I found that the article lacked in some areas, I though that it was useful to point out that motivation plays a factor in how successful a user is an elearning environment. In my experience, there must be a motivating factor for a user to engage in the elearning – such as a requirement for a degree. I found that like the author, more research needs to be done to examine how to motivate users though I think that the article provides a good standing point to understand what other self-regulating tools are used by online learners.

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